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to recognize mrs. coleman for her many years of service and her contributions which have enriched and strengthened our communities. mrs. coleman brings a lifetime of experience to her current position to the united auto workers, a career which began in july of 1967 in the u.a.w.'s women's department. carolyn's skill and knowledge led her to be selected to premiere assignments. she directly assisted many great union leaders in their important work. including u.a.w. vice president's dick shoemaker, and carl raveson, as well as u.a.w. president owen bieber, and treasurer dennis rayhams, her current supervisor. her work is impeccable. her advice valued. and her friendship treasured. carolyn was one of the many unsung heroes of the labor movement. she was never the one who gained headlines for making fiery speeches that inspired the masses or received credit for major agreements that have lifted so many working families into the prosperous middle class, but behind the scenes she contributed to both. for 45 years carolyn coleman reported to work for the united auto workers with one simp
was located between her brain and skull, right behind her right ear. mrs. clinton is making excellent progress. they also predict a full recovery. >>> 2013 arrives in the u.s. in just a matter of hours. the wait is especially exciting and cold for folks in new york city's times square. >>> welcome back, everybody. with less than six hours until 2013, hundreds of thousands of people are in new york's times square for the annual new year's eve celebration. many of them arrived before dawn to get the best spots to watch mayor michael plume berg and the world famous rockettes drop the giant ball at the stroke of midnight. security is very tight. police are checking all bags, plus no alcohol is allowed. if you think it's cold here, windchills are going to make it feel well below freezing tonight in the big apple. police in our area will be out in force looking for drunk drivers. if you've had too much to drink, don't put your life or somebody else's life at risk. for a safe ride home call sober ride at 1-800-200-taxi. fares under $30 are free. >>> a lot of people within dering about new year's eve
to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocated for support for nasa
of the appropriations committee, mrs. lowey, congratulate her on becoming the new ranking member. mrs. lowey: and i congratulate you on the wisdom that you share with us. mr. speaker, i rise in strong opposition to the bill. instead of putting forth a serious comprehensive and balanced deficit reduction plan, the republicans are taking a time-out so the house can embark on yet another effort to pass portions of the ryan budget. the same ryan budget that would end compare as we know it, walk away from the caps on discretionary spending agreed to in the budget control act and has no chance of being signed into law. our constituents want us to negotiate, agree to a solution to avoid economic catastrophe. i had concerns of some of the proposals that the president made in his negotiations with the speaker but at least the president was seeking a workable compromise. instead they walked away from the negotiating table, given everything our country has been through in the last two months from superstorm sandy to the tragedy of newtown, the last thing americans need is the politicians to refuse to compromi
none other than majority leader nancy pelosi. listen to her advice to mr. boehner. >> do you know what it was like for me to bring a bill to florida to fund the war in iraq? it's tough. but you have to do it. so is the point that you don't want to put your members on the spot? figure it out. we did. figure it out. >> figure it out. sound advice. >> we did. [ laughter ] >> it's true, i think that pelosi, that example, is a really vivid one, if nothing else. considering the opposition that the democrats had. the compromise that she had to make. and, as i said, there are compromising going on that we don't know about. a lot of what boehner is doing is posturing in order to appeal to people on the base and to donors. he needs to look like he fought the good fiegts. in public, it needs to look like he's really standing up for conservative principles, however confused those may be. and, in private, he may be making deals. he's known to be a man who is good at that kind of politics. this is sort of the thing where it is interesting to see that the republicans are making a bet that this postur
on the consulate in libya. her spokesman says mrs. clinton is recuperating at home and the secretary of state will testify before congress next month. >>> and in africa, the united states is closing its embassy in the country of the central after condition republic. the state department is ordering the american ambassador and all his staff to leave immediately. rebels there have been closing in on the capital this week. an air force c-40 evacuated 40 americans overnight and the u.s. is telling all americans there to get out now. out now. >>> this just in to the fox 5 newsroom. russian president vladimir putin has signed a bill that bars americans from adopting russian children. we've been following this story and beth parker has more on the impact now here at home. >> reporter: tatiana mcfadden is a three time gold medalist sprinter in the paralimpics. she was adopted in 1994. >> i was adopted age six. no russian family wanted to adopt me. >> a woman from howard county maryland rescued her from that orphanage. >> i saw her and i looked at her and i said that is going to be my mom. >> reporter
high schoolteachers. >> second grade teacher miss french no, i would not want her carrying a gun. >> mr. fobb, he was a head case. he was talking about -- a jet flew overhead. noise pollution. went right on back to talking about it. >> stephanie: oh boy. great, a teacher with an overstartled response. >> nice. >> i think dr. hunsaker might have been packing heat every day. i think she was. >> is that who you are? >> stephanie: i'm picturing mrs. thornton who had glasses the thickest -- and her eyes were looking different ways. >> little googly eyed. >> stephanie: you couldn't tell who she was looking at in class. that might have been a little disturbing. yeah. ooh. then there was the one priest with the really bad anger management problem. now that i'm looking back, oh, boy. 46 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> announcer: it's like a mensa meeting with fart jokes. it's "the stephanie miller show." [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'l
pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers but i'll continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlelady from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i want to thank the gentleman from utah for his work on this bill, and i particularly want to thank the chairman of the full committee, mr. issa, who went to great lengths to make sure that this bill in fact made the agenda of the conference and who has been so important to understanding and making sure that particularly minor bills like this receive quick treatment. i must say in addition to his work on very, very important bills for the district of columbia that are still in progress, like our budget autonomy bill. with that, mr. speaker, i have no further speakers, and i yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: mr. speaker, we urge passage and i yield back. the speaker pro temp
matsui, for her great work on this issue. and i so appreciate the leadership and partnership of mr. kind and mr. murphy in combining these two important health care bills in order to both provide safer, more affordable access to care for those with compromised immune deficiencies as well as finding ways to save money with the important medicare program and the smart act. i want to thank dan elling, staff director of the ways and means subcommittee on health, as well as jennifer sefarian for her leadership of ways and means committee. but i especially want to thank my constituent and friend, crarle ann, the mom of david, for her -- carol ann, the mom of david, for her hard work on behalf of these patients. and the founder of the immunodeficiency network, for years who came up here asking for this help in change. today, this congress, republicans and democrats alike, joined together in providing that help and access. i urge support for this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1845, as amen
is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threat. earlier this month, north korea carried out a missile launch using ballistic missile technology in correct defiance of the international community this important resolution condemns their launch, calls on the north korea to live up to its commitments, admere to its international obligations and deal piecefully with its neighbors. this is a blatant violation of the u.n. security council resolutions. 1718 and 1874. we urge the security council to take strong and concerted action to demonstrate that pyongyang's actions are completely unacceptable. in familiar -- in particular we call on china and russia to work construct ily with other members of the council to show that the international community is united in condemning north korea's provocative behavior. north korea is only further isolating itself with its irresponsible action and the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons will never bring the
the deadly before the words. so please do have on the floor democratic leader and the yield to her the customary one minute. >> think you -- thank you, mr. speaker. i think the gentleman for yielding and rise in support of the resolution, very important resolution to condemn the act of a lone gunman in newtown, conn., and to offer condolences to the families and members of the community. i join him in the words of this resolution in saluting the coverage of the teachers and administrators who gave their lives to save the children and their care. the first responders your ride on the scene to and the succession of killings that were happening. those first responders, they leave their homes every day knowing they're going to face danger, and they did that day as well. in the face of it, they were heroic, as were the teachers and counselors and principle of this school. this has all been made very clear to us by our colleagues. of course congress meant murphy, senator elect murphy, who represents the district with such distinction in compassion. congressman courtney,, congressman jim
: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. smith: madam speaker, i yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. cole, who is the sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. cole: i thank you, madam speaker, and i thank the gentleman for yielding. and i would like to ask, madam speaker, at the appropriate time if i could submit a written statement on this particular piece of legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cole: i had a long oration i was going to make but i want to be quite honest. my good friend, chairman smith, and my good friend, chairman lofgren, have covered the case well or better than i can. they're both drished -- distinguished attorneys. they understand the intricacies involved here. so there's no need for me to go through and repeat the points that they've made. i do want to make one central point or two points. first i want to thank both of them. this is a matter of justice. this is a bipartisan effort, to try and make sure th
i did not support her politically, i would support the lady she has been, kind and gentle. mrs. schmidt has managed to disagree with so many of the differences we have in policy and yet the first thing that you would ever see on her face is a smile, asking, how are you feeling? and having a genuine concern about that. and i personally will miss you and miss the greetings we had for each other, sharing each other's family experiences and it's really a classic example of showing what this great body used to be, and what it can become when people can just take a few minutes and realize that we may all come from different political philosophies but we are still brothers and sisters and children of god and i also want to thank the judge for giving me this opportunity to speak to the great buckeye delegation. thank you so much. >> i'd like to -- mr. tiberi: i want to recognize the gentleman from pennsylvania. >> i'd like to recognize the members of the ohio tell gation, mr. steve austria, he's become a good friend a tireless advocate for ohio and his district but even more important
the evidence prove? and frankly, her lawyer, mr. bill cherry, is one of the finest attorneys in ft. lauderdale. he has the right to investigate this matter. and while being in the netherlands by itself is an innocuous fact, why aren't they answering these questions? >> that's not true. >> the trail of evidence will lead him to the end result, and if it's innocuous and there really is no mr. aguilar living and alive today, come forward and answer these questions. why can't they tell us what's going on? maybe there's more to the story, and that's why they're not coming forward. but the bottom line is this needs to be investigated, and jamie, as a surviving wife, has the right to know what the truth is concerning her husband. harris: tad? >> well, the bottom line here is if they're hiding money, it's easy to follow a paper trail of money. and this situation is no different than any other paper trail. also how hard would it be to get an investigator in the netherlands to look around, follow the money trail and see if they see anything that doesn't look proper? the bottom line is the only thing tha
of the fiscal cliff. mr. mccain: may i thank the senator from maryland, as always, for her usual courtesy and i think she had a very important message and i appreciate not only the words themselves but her eloquence and passion. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the senator from south carolina be included in a colloquy during my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i, like i believe all of us just finished watching the president's remarks at -- i guess it was the executive office building. and i'm not sure yet as i sort out my impressions of the president's remarks as to whether to be angry or to be saddened. i've been around this town for a number of years, and as is well known, i had an interest in the presidency more than academic and i've watched a lot of presidents, going back to president reagan from the standpoint of a member of congress. and i've watched these other crises as we go through them, whether it be the potential shutdown of the government when newt gingrich was speaker of the house, we've seen these other crises as the debt l
, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. katie, beginning in january of 2002, was in her last year of grad school. during that year, in one of the last conversations with her daughter, her mom asked her daughter the same question that many of us receive from our parents. what are you going to do? when you graduate with your master's degree in business? the reply was the
and politically savvy. >> madison loved every minute of it. mrs. byrne -- mrs. monroe hated it. >> she warned her husband. you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it with a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i myself never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is, it is a lot of power. >> part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and make it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i'm constantly reminded about all of the people who lived there before and particularly, all of the women. >> fi
here. mr. adelson, how much mon are you going to spend on the election? >> i did not touch her. she ran back into me. she just grabbed our camera. >> i know you were against the war in iraq, that is ok -- but you thought the war in afghanistan was -- was ok -- you thought that was worth doing. we did not check with the russians to see how they did there for 10 years. [laughter] but we did it. it was -- you know -- it was something -- to be thought about. >> when david koch sat down last night as a member of the u.s. delegation, i went over to ask a question. >> do you think unchecked concentration of wealth will undermine democracy? >> i could not quite hear you. i am deaf in one ear. >> we are not doing any interviews. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. [laughter] [applause] and to heal the planet. [laughter] my promise is to help you and your family. >> one of the first acts of civil disobedience at the democratic national convention took place on tuesday just outside the time warner cable center. >> we are here to ask president obama, who we need a p
back up, which is exactly what nancy pelosi proposed. we will take her proposal. and mr. van hollen says it will not give one a democratic road or something -- for something your leader proposed three months ago. that as political theater, mr. van hollen. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i wish the outgoing chairman of financial services well. this policy did not make the tax proposal that would -- nancy pelosi did not have a tax proposal that would give people earning over $1 million in tax break. no. 2, the proposal the president has put on the table has trillions of dollars of cuts, which is more than in the cuts on the table and would deal with the sequestered. the republican proposal will increase the likelihood taxpayers have to pay -- bailout the financial industry again. they strip away the independence of the consumer finance protection board so that lobbyists can meddle in exactly how they do their work so that they are looking out for the interests of lobbyists rather than the interests of the american people. this approach we're seeing here is another example of trying to help
-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from that sexual assault that night in 1985 was not tested for 20 years. it sat on the shelf in a crime lab somewhere in dallas, texas, because the dallas police department had a new incentive to go and look at those old cases, this case was looked at. that evidence was tested and the dallas police department decided that kevin glenn turner committed this crime back in 1985. but that was 20 years ago. the statute of limitations had run and justice could not occur and lavenia's case, because the system waited too long to find t
the house budget. passed not once but twice. provided real solutions. mr. speaker, here's our spending represented a different way, because there's so many head herrings in this body. i -- red herrings in this body. i want to say, mr. speaker, if you help me spread the word with my colleagues on the left. i'm on the rules committee. we often handle the rules debate here on the floor. it gets toxic from time to time. folks are trying to make their point. everybody's got their talking points. it turns out into an -- turns into an argument instead of a discussion how o to make america better. i do hope in this coming time, whether we use special order to do it, time off the floor to do it, we'll find an opportunity to have more of a discussion. because the facts are what the facts are. we ought to be able to agree on what the facts are, and then we ought to be able to disagree what about the solutions are. we ought to be able to question each other's judgment without questioning each other's motivations. i hope we'll be able to spend some time on that. i heard folks say, mr. speaker, oh,
's the little girl. last spring, it looked like emma was going to lose her battle against leukemia, and doctors used, get this, a strain of hiv to save her life. dr. sanjay gupta joins me ahead to explain. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> hey, ton
leadership on all these adoption issues senator landrieu has shown and look forward to working with her and others as we try to help right this tragic wrong. and i would be glad to yield to my good friend from louisiana. the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i am proud to join my friend, the senator from missouri, on the floor to add voice to this travesty that has recently occurred. the senator from missouri described the situation accurately, that a country that claims to be a powerful nation on the earth has decided to take powerful action against the weakest, most vulnerable individuals on the earth. and those are children without families. it makes no sense whatsoever for the country of russia to take the action that they did, because they're in a disagreement with us here in america, and maybe others around the world, about human rights violations regarding adults. the russian government in front of the whole world has taken that out, their anger and frustration, on their own children. their own children, who are orphans, their
adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe mated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you couldn't move without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you are a little breathless and it was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> he is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. >> they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now, you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am
eleanor holmes norton will welcome more than 200 disadvantaged district children to her 22nd annual d.c. children's christmas party on the hill. they'll be getting gifts and lunch as well as a visit from santa and mrs. claus. >> that's so nice. i don't have such nice news. on the outer loop of the beltway it's jammed basically from college park through silver spring. the accident after connecticut avenue was cleared. we'll go to the northbound side of i-95. again very slow and heavy right through springfield trying to get up toward duke street where the accident was moved. same story over to 66 on traffic land. an accident near route 50 caused this delay. >> looks like christmas lights on the highway. >> all lit up for sure. >>> next on cbs this morning, they're talking about the weapon that was used in the tragedy in newtown, connecticut. several lawmakers are turning to push for stronger gun laws. >>> howard and i will be back in just 25 minutes with a live update on traffic and wept gler watch out for the wind -- weather. >> watch out for the winds today. get updates on news, weath
and say i enjoyed our working relationship over the last six years and note that will continue as well. mr. conyers: thank you very much. i now turn to the gentlelady from texas, a senior member of judiciary, ms. sheila jackson lee. i will yield her as much time as she may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized for as much time as she may consume. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman verp. this is an enormously positive exhibition of the working relationship of the members of the house judiciary committee. and i thank both the chairman and ranking member for the evidence of collegiality of the waning moments of the 112th congress. i want to follow my ranking member and acknowledge appreciation for the service of judiciary committee chairperson lamar smith who happens to be a tall texan and so we are delighted to thank him very much for the work that he's done. and to join with and established icon of judiciary prominence in john conyers, the two matched well in their excellence. and i thank the ranking member and the former chairperson for his work and
to do. but -- >> but i loved the scene that you have with her and -- >> and thaddeus -- >> thaddeus stevens, the republican radical congressman from -- >> pennsylvania. >> pennsylvania played by tommy lee jones. here it is. >> mrs. lincoln. >> madame president, if you please. oh, don't convene another subcommittee to investigate me. sir! i'm teasing. smile senator wade. senator wade in lincoln: i believe i am smiling mrs. lincoln. >> as long as your household accounts are in order madam we'll have no need to investigate them. >> you have always taken such a lively even prosecutorial interest in my household accounts. >> your household accounts have always been so interesting. >> yes, thank you, it's true. the miracles i have wrought out of fertilizer bills and cutlery invoices, but i had to. >> such character. >> yeah. >> i mean, shines through. >> she was a brilliant, brilliant woman. and she hated the radicals' guts because they tried to actually indict her. lincoln stepped in and stopped them from doing it, but -- >> because? >> well, he didn't want a scandal -- >> but why did th
to talk her out of it. >> and it's irrelevant relevant who came up with the idea first because the idea was out there. ultimately, it's up to the president. if she calls him up and says mr. president, this is too difficult for me. it's too hard. i can't do this. i would like to withdraw my name, he can very easily say, you know this is your -- i am the president, i am going to stand by you 100% and, boom. >> that's the president telling you that. she could maybe still have the fortitude to say no but most people presented with that are going to say, mr. president, om okay. i am in. you are right. that did not happen. >> how did this -- what do we know because again, at the briefing yesterday boehner had had the news kong friends in the morning where he once again said, we are ready to deal but the white house is not ready to deal. they won't come up with any specifics, which i think is just bs. that's what he said yesterday morning. he announces. jay carney says there it is. nothing happening on that front. suddenly boehner shows up at the whitehouse. h
and audition in 1991 to play my wife in "mr. saturday night." she gave a fantastic greeting but she was a little too young. i called her agent and said she's not going to get the part but she's phenomenal. she's a great actress, so cute so beautiful. she's everything. >> yeah. >> so then when we said who could blake her, i said -- she comes into the same office that she auditioned for me and, yeah -- she said now? >> she said now am i too old? >> our scenes together are like father/daughter. >> i still remember you from "my cousin vinny." what was that iconic line. >> my biological clock. >> you know how to do comedy you now how to do drama. do you like dog one more than the other? >> i love doing comedy. i had the greatest time on the film. i love being with these guys and it affirmed for me this is what i want to do. i want to do comedies. comedies comedies. but sometimes, you know -- >> why did it take time from the time she walked in to i have a brilliantied. >> you are billy crystal. >> you reach a certain age where they don't terrorist you like they used t
saying, we can't go back to school, we can't go back to school. our teacher is dead. mrs. soto, we don't have a teacher. and i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: the school nurse told abc's george stephanopoulos how she crouched under her desk and held her breath. >> while you're under there, you actually see the feet of the shooter? >> i could see him from the knees down. see the legs. >> right in front of you? >> 20 feet away, facing -- his boots were facing my desk. >> then he turned and walked away? >> it was seconds. he turned and walked out. and i heard the door close. >> reporter: and for the rabbi, the tough task of explaining to the faithful where the evil that struck last friday comes from. >> i don't believe that god did this. i believe a crazy man did this. the meaning in it is not trying to understand why god does something. somehow we got here. we have to not necessarily always look towards god but look towards humanity and say what is it that we've done that has created this environment. >> reporter: the clergy of the small new england town say that the horrors of last we
as you go forward. i asked to commend the commissioner for her work on prison, the petitions. i appreciate the progress made and encourage the commission to resolve these matters as quickly as possible. mr. chairman, members of the commission, thank you. >> thank you. mr. barton, you are recognized. >> thank you. i am tempted to yield back to mr. dingell and let him continue asking his yes or no questions. sooner or later, he will get to one they cannot answer. the chairman asked a question that i will put a different slant on. he referred to that part of the hr 3630 that the commission, in making these reassignment or reallocations, shall make every effort, every reasonable effort to preserve the existing population and coverage area for each broadcast licensee. on the next page, 72, said the paragraph 5, with regard to low- power television usage, it says nothing in this subsection shall be construed to alter the spectrum. in the fcc power point presentation in response to the question can low-power television participate in a reverse auction, the answer to that is no. i under
the end of the summer pickup were to carson and her asian was not going to publish the chapter. they were going to publish township tours. the effect that was enormous. before this year by mrs. published as a book, he was destined to be a bestseller, which it did and it turned carson immediately into a household name and as i said earlier, one of the most famous writers in america. the sea around us was number one on "the new york times" bestseller list for 39 straight weeks. it was on the bestsellers list for several years interesting at the time of the top 10, her publisher decided to reissue the earlier book from 1841 called under the sea wind, the one that disappeared without a trace it onto the bestseller lists for a period of time, rachel carson had two of the top 10 books in america at the same time on the bestseller list. the sea around us from the national book award, which is in its infancy at the time. the second or third time it has been awarded yet this is a picture at the awards banquet with the other winners that year. on the far left is mary ann moore to run for poetry and
, dropped from public view until her death in july. >> you haven't answered the question, mr. president. >> from space to time, mike wallace spent 60 years mostly on "60 minutes" and most often afflicting the comfortable with his confrontational style of journalism. wallace died in april. another television star, dick clark, was the maker of teen idols on "american bandstand" and rang in the new year for america for nearly four decades. as familiar as the whistle that opens his tv show, andy griffith planned to be a preacher or opera singer but settled on acting which he did up until his death in july. when larry hagman was shot as j.r. ewing on "dallas," it was the most watched point in his career that gan -- began on "i dream of jeannie." and joe paterno was sullied by the child sex abuse scandal at penn state that broke just before his death in january. etta james died in january 50 years after her version of "at last" became a must at millions of weddings. whitney houston died in february. ♪ i will always love you ♪ >> donna summer, in may. and some unique sounds fell silent, to
tennessee. mr. alexander: i speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. alexander: i want to thank the senator from california for her comments on the senate rules. i agree, this is something we should be able to talk among ourselves and work out. some of us who have been here a little while, watch the senate, know that it is a unique institution and fundamentally most of us are not very happy with the idea -- i think on bodge sidebothsides of the aisle not functioning as effectively as we really should. we need to get bills to the floor and then we need to have amendments. it's been historically the responsibility of the majority to decide what comes to the floor. and historically the minority, whom that happens twhomever thas the opportunity to have amendments. a couple of things have happened. the minority has blocked bills coming to the floor. that didn't happen. it happened 25 years ago. something else happened over the last 25 years. a procedure called filling the tree was invented by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dol
and worked as a photojournalist. she is here with her husband and she follows her father to the chautauqua stage. he spoke here when he was minority leader of the u.s. house of representatives. lynda johnson robb is the first child of lyndon johnson and lady bird johnson. [laughter] mrs. robb has served for 44 years and is now chairman emeritus. she was appointed by president jimmy carter to serve as chair of the president's advisory committee for women. she put her own career, including as a contributing editor @ "ladies' home journal" on hold to work with her husband on his successful virginia and the minute choral candidacy. as virginia's first lady, she launched and chaired the grid kenya district -- the virginia history project. she is here with her husband who has always been here before and her daughter and grandchildren. previously, a columnist and associate editor for "the new york sun" and chief speechwriter for read giuliani -- for rudy giuliani, he was responsible for writing the eulogies for the firefighters and fresh responders who died on 9/11. evelyn is also editor of the a
, the bullets were there. these two wonderful kids were saved by the bravery of the wonderful teacher, mrs. clemens, for which we will ever be thankful for and will never be enough. she pulled them in her own classroom and barricaded the door. they were safe. unfortunately for many families in our town, it's not true. i cannot describe what i feel about that. if we could not -- if we could rewind the reality and prevent what happened, i would give anything to do it. now my story. for many years, i watched what was happening in this country. i am an immigrant. i've been here 22 years. and i -- i held these believes, america has the -- deep history with guns. it's part of american history. gun owners and people who handle guns, they know how to keep them safe and be responsible. our politicians will do whatever they can to make sure our kids are safe. and you know, every time something like columbine, virginia tech, aurora, were happening, i would avert my eyes and i would still think that something will be done. but all those beliefs were shattered on friday. and now i think we all need to
and trashy. donald trump sued her on behalf of his miss universe organization and miss usa is part of that, claiming she had defamed the organization. a judge in arbitration just agreed with mr. trump and awarded the miss universe organization $5 million in damages. was that the right decision? let's ask our panel. joining me now, arthur aidala, former prosecutor, now defense attorney. jonna spilbor, same pedigree. well come. i have to say, when he first filed it, i thought, that is just trump. he doesn't like what she said, she is entitled to her opinion. this arbitration judge did not see it that way. this is a big win for "the donald", arthur. >> it is a big win. hopefully donald trump doesn't need five million bucks. megyn: maybe he will donate it to charity if he can get it. >> be honest i don't think the woman has $5 million. let everyone understand, this is arbitration. this is not a trial. a judge sits in a room, a lot of times a former judge sits in a room and hears both side. however he didn't hear both side. the contestant decided she, her and her lawyer decided they weren't goi
reagan was responsible, her tradition was celebrity santas. >> and nancy was about hollywood, bringing a little glitz to the white house and my favorite one was when mr. t came to the white house and pity the fool that year, santa for christmas and just funny photo, a phone moment in time and had larry hagman and one year her own husband, the president surprised her with santa. >> alisyn: great stuff. so barbara bush, what did she do. >> barbara bush had her cause of literacy, a story book christmas and took actual books on hung them on the tree and nutcracker, and needle point and one year everything was needle pointed. >> alisyn: and laura bush. >> one of my favorites, so elegant and timeless, she did a red white and blue christmas for their last christmas in office and borrowed her mother-in-law's theme and a story book christmas, she was a librarian. >> alisyn: and the theme was home for the holidays. >> that applies to everyone. >> alisyn: in 2001, home for the holidays right after 9/11, the theme. the theme was picked prior to 9/11, but that year made it even more special and we
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